PHL 235: Philosophy and the City: Course Objectives

Narrative

The purpose of this class is to provide students with an introduction to disciplined and reflective thinking about urban environments and issues. Cities shape, and are shaped by philosophical ideas about morality, justice, diversity, and aesthetics. Careful thought about this philosophical dimension is thus essential to an education that aims to infuse students with an urban leadership outlook.


Student Learning Outcomes

Course Specific:

By the end of the term, the successful student in this course will:

  • be able cogently to explain how philosophical thought arising in urban spaces both influences and is influenced by the communicative, moral, and political interaction of diverse groups of people found in those spaces.
  • be able cogently to explain how moral, political, and aesthetic ideals and argumentation both shape cities and are shaped by them.

Institutional Learning Outcomes:

By the end of the term, the successful student in this course will have:

  • demonstrated ability to communicate effectively through class participation and in writing on preparation assignments and tests.
  • demonstrated effective leadership through successful completion of in-class group work.
  • demonstrated critical and creative thinking skills pertaining to analyzing and assessing arguments, concepts, and ideas drawn from our readings.
  • demonstrated facility in applying integrative learning through the use of the course website, Google Calendar, and online course assignments.
  • become acquainted with philosophical approaches to some of the complex issues of social justice that arise within cities.

Urban Leadership Learning Outcomes:

By the end of the term, the successful student in this course will have:

  • have been introduced to philosophical methods of recognizing and analyzing urban and global complexities (systems thinking).
  • have actively and regularly practiced civility in class discussions and collaborative group work.
  • have actively and regularly practiced collaboration both in small groups and as a class in order to realize the objectives of the course.

Programmatic Learning Outcome:

By the end of the term, the successful student in this course will have:

  • have a sufficient familiarity with basic philosophical techniques, methods and strategies to pursue other, more advanced philosophy courses.

Disclaimer: The professor will, of course, endeavor to help students achieve these outcomes, but real learning requires substantial effort on the part of the student. Students should therefore not expect to achieve these outcomes without engaging in the sustained, conscientious study and actual work necessary to complete all the class requirements at an adequate or better level. Nor should it be thought that this is possible without due observation of the course policies.

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