Course Policies

These are our course policies. If you are unwilling or unable to abide by these requirements then you should take a different class.

Conduct

You should consider our classroom to be a professional environment and observe the same standards of conduct that you would expect to observe in a high-level, face-to-face business meeting. It is expected that all persons in this class will comport themselves with the dignity and respect due to themselves and to their colleagues. This includes coming to class on time, refraining from having side-discussions while lecture is in progress, refraining from studying materials for other classes during lecture, refraining from bringing any food to class, refraining from texting during class, and leaving at home or turning off any and all items that make sudden, disruptive noises, especially cell phones. Please don’t bring children to class unless it is absolutely unavoidable, and if you must do so please notify the professor in advance as early as possible. Failure to observe these guidelines may affect your participation evaluation.

Use of Technology

Handheld Communications Devices

Cell phones, iPods and other such devices must be turned off and put away during class. Texting during class absolutely is not permitted. If the professor so much as sees a cell phone lying on the desk or table, class will be over. Students will still be responsible for the scheduled material even if class is ended prematurely due to cell phone usage. If a student believes that he or she has a special condition that warrants a temporary exception to this rule, that student should speak with the professor as soon as possible. The instructor reserves the right to refuse any such request.

Laptop Usage

Laptop computers, netbooks, and other such devices may not be used in class without a letter from Student Support Services directing their use.

Recording Devices

Dictation and other devices may not be used in class without a letter from Student Support Services directing their use.

Technological Failure

The price of the benefit of not having to buy a book for this class is that many of our readings and assignments will be accessed online. It is your responsibility to secure access to or maintain your own computer and internet connection capability for this purpose. As the College has ample technological resources located across many locations on campus, technological failure will not excuse lateness of any assignment, failure to complete assigned readings, etc.. Students should be aware that they can also access computers through the library of University of Detroit-Mercy, and at many municipal libraries through the metro-Detroit area, if not through permission from their own workplaces where possible. Careful planning thus negates the need to consider technological failure as a valid excuse for anything.

Technological Skills and Assistance

Your success in this class critically depends upon your competence in basic technological tasks like sending and receiving e-mail through your Marygrove account, and accessing materials (including all parts of your syllabus, course readings and assignments) on the World Wide Web. Those who need to develop these competencies or who experience technical problems throughout the course of the term, including problems with internet connections or file access, are directed first to the Technology Information and Collaboration Center (STICC) in the basement of the Marygrove Library. You may call the STICC at 313-927-1582. Additionally, you will find that many Library staff are knowledgeable and helpful when it comes to technology issues. For concerns with computers in the dorms and in the campus computer labs, call campus tech support at 313-927-1282.

Late and Make-up Work

Students are accountable for turning in all assigned work on time. As in the "real world" late work is not accepted, ever, for any reason. Please don't ask. The answer is "no". You will be given sufficient time for the completion of all work assigned to you in this class. The opportunity to miss two sets of study questions and two days of class without penalty should compensate for the usual sort of absences. I will not even consider scheduling or accepting make-up assignments unless:

1. more than two have been missed and

2. highly unusual, severe, and sufficiently verifiable circumstances have been demonstrated to my satisfaction.

If you know, or suspect that you will be absent on the day that an assignment is due, please notify the professor as far in advance as possible so that satisfactory alternative arrangements can be made. You cannot expect accommodation on short notice (i.e. phone messages left at 4 AM the morning of class).

Do not e-mail, FAX, or by any other means convey late or early assignments to the professor without a prior arrangement to do so. Assignments received in such ways will be disregarded. Remember that part of the assignment is following the instructions given for it. Employers, the government, and courts of law often dictate the manner in which they wish to receive information, and disregard information presented in other ways—even if it is the exact same information. Consider this class part of your training in reading the fine print.

If you miss class for any reason, it is your responsibility to get the notes from a classmate and familiarize yourself with whatever material you may have missed. I do not give out my notes. I highly recommend making at least one contact in class who can provide you with notes and assignments in the event that you miss class.

Incompletes and Withdrawing from Class

Incompletes

Incompletes (grades of “I”) will not be given unless: 1) highly unusual and severe circumstances prevent a student from completing the work necessary to complete the class, 2) enough work has been done, in the professor’s judgment, to leave only a minimal amount of work remaining for the student to complete, and 3) the student expressly requests a such a grade at least one week before the day scheduled by the College for the final exam.

Withdrawals

In the instructor's view, it is the prerogative of the student to withdraw from the class when ever he or she deems it necessary to do so. That said, current federal and state laws are such that withdrawing from class can have serious repercussions for a student's financial aid status. For this reason, students are strongly urged to seek counseling with the college's financial aid department prior to withdrawing from this or any class.

For this term the last day to withdraw is November 24, 2014

Plagiarism and Cheating Policy

The academic honesty policy of Marygrove College strictly forbids cheating and plagiarism. Neither will be tolerated for any reason. Should you do either you will receive an “E” for the assignment on the first occasion, and the student’s adviser and the Dean will be informed in accord with Marygrove’s academic standards policy. Repeated offenses will merit stronger disciplinary measures, which the professor will pursue. PLEASE READ THE ACADEMIC HONESTY POLICY NOW. Ignorance of the College's academic honesty policy does not excuse violations. Click here for helpful advice on how to avoid plagiarism.

Disability Policy

Marygrove College maintains a supportive academic environment for students with disabilities. To ensure equal access to all educational programs, activities and services, students with disabilities should notify the College, provide documentation, and request reasonable accommodations. If you require academic accommodations in this course, you must contact Disability Support Services by email ude.evorgyram|ssd#ude.evorgyram|ssd to establish an accommodations plan with the Coordinator.

Syllabus Revisions

The professor bears the sole responsibility to revise any part of this syllabus should it become necessary to do so. Any such revision that takes place will be announced in class with as much advance notice as the circumstances permit. It is the student’s responsibility to remain abreast of any such changes and to alter his or her own workload accordingly. In the absence of any notification to the contrary, students should follow the course plan and reading schedule as given below, or the most recent set of revisions (if any have been made). The silence of this syllabus on any matter that may arise pertaining to this class shall not be construed to indicate that the matter is up for debate. The professor’s interpretation of this syllabus shall be final and binding.

Communication

Meetings

The purpose of office hours is to set aside time for physical meetings in real time. Students who wish to meet with the professor during office hours must set an appointment to do so. This assists the professor in prioritizing the needs of students over the many other demands the College places upon him. Those who set appointments are strongly advised to keep them. All meetings will be held in the professor's office, the location of which is given under "Basic Course Information" on the main syllabus page.

e-mail messages

The most effective way to reach the professor outside of office hours is by e-mail. The professor will make every effort to answer reasonable messages within a 12 hour window. Students should be aware that e-mails sent before 9 AM, after 7 PM, or anytime on Sunday will generally have a much slower response time. If you send an e-mail please follow the following guidelines:

• State the course number and the purpose of your message in the subject line (e.g. “need help with assignment in PHL 999” or “PHL 999 reading question”). Please do not use your name or student number as the subject of your message.

• Begin the body of your message by giving your first and last name, the course number and title, and the days and time at which your course meets in the body of the message (e.g. “Hello, Professor. This is Javier von Student from the Monday-Wednesday 9AM section of PHL 999, Philosophy of Grey Matter.”).

• Phrase your request in the clear, concise, and respectful language appropriate to a professional communication, which such messages are. Avoid giving commands like “Respond ASAP.”. Bear in mind that while professors are employees of the College, and they try do (or at least should) work for your benefit in their capacity as professors (professors, especially at Marygrove College, do many other things besides teach—it is at most only one-third of the job), this does not mean that you may direct their actions as would a boss or a supervisor. Attempting to give orders to a professor is an egregious breach of proper etiquette and will reflect poorly on the student who does so. Students are advised to reflect on how they wish to be perceived. Maintaining a courteous, professional tone is nearly always advisable.

• Part of maintaining a professional tone means proofreading your correspondence. Please compose e-mails as you would cover-letters for a job, paying attention to spelling, correct grammar, and so on. This will make your communications clear, and better enable the professor to understand your concern and respond appropriately.

• Please allow at least 12 hours for a response before e-mailing a second time. Typically you will get a response well before that time has elapsed, but if you do not, please bear in mind that the professor has many students who need assistance and many professional and scholarly duties outside the classroom that directly or indirectly benefit students to which he must attend. Simply because the professor doesn't respond immediately do not assume that he has not received your message, doesn't care, etc.. At Marygrove College professors have many responsibilities outside the classroom. Your professor may simply be attending to these.

Phone calls and voice mail

Students may phone for assistance with class-related matters, but should be aware that the professor will not be able to answer the phone while he is off campus, and that means more often than not that the student will reach voice mail. Similarly students should be aware that if a student has an appointment during office hours, the phone will not be answered while the appointment is in progress. Hence, even phone calls placed during office hours may not be answered and may be referred to voice mail. While the professor will check voice mail, the system on campus is somewhat subject to reliability concerns and your message may not reach the professor in as timely a manner as the student might wish. This is why e-mail is preferred. Students should bear in mind the following guidelines:

• Please do not simply hang up if you receive voice mail. This does not count as having tried to contact the professor. Only leaving a message does.

• Begin your message by giving your first and last name, the course number and title, and the days and time at which your course meets in the body of the message (e.g. “Hello, Professor. This is Javier von Student from the Monday-Wednesday 9AM section of PHL 999, Philosophy of Grey Matter.”).

• Phrase your request in the clear, concise, and respectful language appropriate to a professional communication, which such messages are. Please bear in mind that all of the considerations under 4.7.2 above regarding the maintenance of a professional tone for your communications applies to phone calls and voice messages too.

• Please speak as clearly and articulately as you can, and choose a location for your call that will minimize the background noises that may make your call or message difficult to hear and understand.

• Please allow until 12 noon the following day for a response to voice-mail messages before phoning again. Simply because the professor doesn't respond immediately do not assume that he has not received your message, doesn't care, etc.. At Marygrove College professors have many responsibilities outside the classroom. Your professor may simply be attending to these.

• It is advisable to send an e-mail message even when you've left a voice-mail message in case the voice-mail system fails. For e-mail protocols, see the above section.

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